PRSA NJ Spring Newsletter

Public Relations: An Important and Evolving Profession

Stacy HanasMichele Hujber, APR
PRSA NJ APR Chair

Publicists. Event Planners. Spin Doctors.

For years, those were the perceptions of the public relations practitioner. In the early days of the 20th century, there was some truth to those perceptions. Lack of training and ethical standards on the part of some practitioners perpetuated the negative perception of individuals who claimed to be public relations “professionals.”

In today’s world, the emergence of Accreditation has helped to bring stronger credibility to the public relations profession, especially by practitioners who have chosen to complete the strenuous process that leads to Accreditation. Being able to use APR (Accredited in Public Relations) is a mark of distinction for public relations practitioners who commit to the profession through ethical practices and sound judgment, strategic perspectives, knowledge of best practices, and the use of the research-planning-implementation-evaluation process.

Accreditation supports the maturation of the field of public relations, helping it move toward becoming a true profession similar to other professions that require certification or other credentialing. Ethics are and have been a central part of the Accreditation process. Once professionals are Accredited in Public Relations, they are required to follow a strict code of ethical standards.

Hiring managers and clients who choose Accredited public relations professionals know they have chosen strategic thinkers who have demonstrated skills and abilities necessary to advise executives or managers on how best to establish and maintain the relationship necessary to meet organizational objectives. These professionals have completed the Accreditation process and are committed to maintaining that Accreditation through professional and personal development. That sets Accredited professionals apart from other practitioners.

Today, eight professional organizations comprise the Universal Accreditation Board (UAB) and participate in the Accreditation process: Agricultural Relations Council, Florida Public Relations Association, Maine Public Relations Council, National School Public Relations Association, Public Relations Society of America, Religion Communicators Council, Southern Public Relations Federation, and Asociación de Relacionistas Profesionales de Puerto Rico (Puerto Rico Public Relations Association).

This year marks the 50th anniversary of APR. It is a process that continues to evolve, but it is a process that has brought credibility to an important profession that has wide-ranging impact.
To find out more about completing the process of becoming an APR, contact PRSA NJ APR Chair, Michele Hujber, at Michele@hujberpr.com.

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Articles:

President's Note

Public Relations: An Important and Evolving Profession

New Jersey Universities Collaborate on Public Relations Education

University Professor Named New President of PRSA NJ

PRSA NJ Senior Pros Group Shoot-The-Breeze Event Took Place on Tuesday, April 29 at New Jersey American Water in Voorhees

Ask the Professional

Reporters Tell PR Pros New State of the Newsroom at PRSA NJ Meet the Media Event

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Video Killed the Radio Star & Twitter Buried Facebook: Meet the Media Panel Discussion

We want to hear what you think…

Career Opportunities

Member News & Notes

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Upcoming Events: Meet the Media May 8, 24th Annual Pyramid Awards June 18th
 
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